The week in money and markets: GameStop’s new gambit, is Keurig Dr. Pepper a buy?

Former financial plaything GameStop wants to play the stock market

The GameStop logo displayed at a terminal on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor.

Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images (Getty Images)

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Is now the right time to buy Keurig Dr. Pepper stock? | Smart Investing

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Is now the right time to buy Keurig Dr. Pepper stock? | Smart Investing

How to find holiday shopping discounts | Your Wallet

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Normally, when a company builds up a huge cash position and not much debt, it uses the money to buy back shares and reward investors. Not GameStop. Instead, the retailer-turned-meme-stock announced it will now allow CEO and chairman Ryan Cohen to invest its $900 million in cash and cash equivalents in other companies’ stocks.—Melvin Backman | Read More

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Restaurants are raising wages faster than their food prices

A Chipotle restaurant advertises it is hiring in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., August 28, 2023.

Restaurants are operating in a very tight labor market.
Photo: Brian Snyder (Reuters)

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No, you’re not imagining it—menu prices are rising. But US restaurant workers are seeing their pay increase even faster than food prices, and it’s helping to chip away at wage inequality.—Michelle Cheng | Read More

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How to find holiday shopping discounts | Your Wallet

How to find holiday shopping discounts | Your Wallet

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Shopping, deals, and personal finance expert Kristin McGrath tells Quartz how to get the most bang for your buck while shopping for the holidays

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Is now the right time to buy Keurig Dr. Pepper stock? | Smart Investing

Is now the right time to buy Keurig Dr. Pepper stock? | Smart Investing

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Bryant VanCronkhite of Allspring Global Investments tells Quartz why he thinks Keurig Dr. Pepper might be a good investment no matter what the Fed does

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Are “buy now pay later” plans really helping to raise people’s credit scores?

PayPal is shown on a smart phone in front of a computer screen showing an eBay window.

PayPal is one company offering buy-now-pay-later options.
Image: Joe Raedle (Getty Images)

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With gift-buying season upon us along with inflation, record numbers of Americans are turning to buy now pay later (BNPL) plans to avoid paying the full cost of items upfront. And according to a recent survey by data company PYMNTS, more than a third of them think it’s helping their credit scores.—Laura Bratton | Read More